Series of five images showing aerial views of Caistor Roman Town as it might have looked in the 4th century AD (© Daniel Voisey)

Caistor Roman Town (Venta Icenorum)

Management of the site

Summary

The present site of Caistor Roman Town is a Scheduled Ancient Monument owned by the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and managed by South Norfolk Council.

Further information

How the site is managed

The management, use and future development of the site for cultural heritage purposes are guided by the Caistor Joint Advisory Board comprising representatives from the Norfolk Archaeological Trust, South Norfolk Council, Norfolk County Council, the Parochial Church Council and Caistor Parish Council. Members of Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service and English Heritage also sit on the Joint Advisory Board.

The importance of Caistor Roman Town

The importance of the site has been recognised by the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) who have given a substantial grant for the conservation of the town’s walls under the Countryside Stewardship Scheme. This is the first time that DEFRA have funded an entirely archaeological conservation project.

Visiting Caistor Roman Town

If you would like to visit the site, it is open 365 days of the year and is free of charge.

External links

Norfolk Museums & Archaeology Services
Visit the website for more information on displays and educational resources (www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk).


About links to other websites

Contact us

contact officer/team: Countryside and Heritage Development Manager
web: online enquiry form
email: lcc@s-norfolk.gov.uk
telephone: 01508 533945
address: South Norfolk Council
South Norfolk House
Swan Lane
Long Stratton
Norwich NR15 2XE

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Last updated on: 07 August 2007

Series of five images showing how Caistor Roman Town might have looked from the ground in the 4th century AD (© Daniel Voisey)